Last edited by Yoll
Tuesday, July 14, 2020 | History

3 edition of Constitution of the Anti-slavery Society of Salem and Vicinity found in the catalog.

Constitution of the Anti-slavery Society of Salem and Vicinity

Anti-Slavery Society of Salem & Vicinity (Mass.)

Constitution of the Anti-slavery Society of Salem and Vicinity

the society organized January 27, A.D. 1834 : Salem, Mass.

by Anti-Slavery Society of Salem & Vicinity (Mass.)

  • 165 Want to read
  • 23 Currently reading

Published by Ives in Salem .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Slavery -- United States -- Societies, etc

  • Edition Notes

    SeriesSlavery, source material and critical literature -- no. 12.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsE449 .A625
    The Physical Object
    FormatMicroform
    Pagination8 p.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL22195953M
    LC Control Number87317587

    The Anti-Slavery Impulse in the Burned-Over District. As an outgrowth of the religious revivals which spread through western New York in the s, the anti-slavery and then the abolition movements were to grow in the rural sectors of upstate New York; they were later to spread to the cities in the s. American Anti-Slavery Society, (–70), promoter, with its state and local auxiliaries, of the cause of immediate abolition of slavery in the United States. As the main activist arm of the Abolition Movement (see abolitionism), the society was founded in under the leadership of William Lloyd.

    The principles, plans, and objects, of "The Hibernian Negro's Friend Society" contrasted with those of the previously existing "anti-slavery societies": being a circular, addressed to all the friends of the Negro, and advocates for the abolition and extinction of slavery: in the form of a letter to Thomas Pringle, Esq., secretary of "The London Anti-slavery Society.". published by the american anti-slavery society, office, no. nassau street. Call number EW (Rare Book Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill).

    Broadside advertising a Fourth of July rally sponsored by the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society in Noted abolitionists including William Lloyd Garrison, Sojourner Truth, and Henry David Thoreau addressed the crowd. In a dramatic climax, Garrison burned copies of the Fugitive Slave Law and the United States Constitution.   The Constitution that protected slavery for three generations, until a devastating war and a constitutional amendment changed the game, was actually antislavery because it didn’t explicitly.


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Constitution of the Anti-slavery Society of Salem and Vicinity by Anti-Slavery Society of Salem & Vicinity (Mass.) Download PDF EPUB FB2

Anti-Slavery Society of Salem and Vicinity, Salem, Mass. Constitution of the Anti-Slavery Society of Salem and Vicinity [microform]: the Society organized Janu A.D.

Salem, Mass Printed by W. & S.B. Ives Salem Australian/Harvard Citation. Get this from a library. Constitution of the Anti-Slavery Society of Salem and Vicinity. [Anti-Slavery Society of Salem & Vicinity (Mass.)].

Resolved, that this Society be supported by voluntary contributions, a part to be appropriated for the purchasing of books, etc.: the other to be reserved until a significant sum be accumulated, which shall then be deposited in a bank for the relief of the needy.

Resolved, that the meetings of this society shall commence with prayer and singing. The Ohio Anti-Slavery Society's constitution stated that its objective was the "abolition of slavery throughout the United States and the elevation of our colored brethren to their proper rank as men." Along with sponsoring traveling lecturers, the Society made James G.

Birney's newspaper The Philanthropist its official press. American Anti-Slavery Society. Executive Committee. Address to the people of color in the City of New York, () Third annual report of the American Anti-Slavery Society: with the speeches delivered at the anniversary meeting, held in the city of New-York, on the 10th May,and the minutes of the meetings of the society for business.

Most fundamentally, anti-slavery constitutionalists pointed out that those who claimed the Constitution protected slavery bore the burden of proving that claim —.

The first time the Constitution references slavery by name was in the 13th amendment, which abolished the institution. Prior to its passage, the Constitution did not support slavery, but it definitely did not denounce it either.

The Constitution's indecisive stance on slavery was one of its biggest weaknesses. James Colaiaco, in his book Frederick Douglass and the Fourth of July, makes the point that this speech given to the Rochester Ladies Anti-Slavery Society.

An anti-slavery orator, Remond ( – ) was a life member of the American Anti-Slavery Society and a leader in the abolitionist movement in Salem. He worked as a professional, full-time speaker for the cause, and toured several times with Frederick Douglass. Introduction.

In Decembermore than 60 abolitionists met in Philadelphia and founded the American Anti-Slavery Society. Devoted to immediate and uncompensated emancipation for African-American slaves, the members of the society drafted the following manifesto to articulate clearly their goals. Book/Printed Material The constitution of the American Anti-Slavery Society: with the Declaration of the National Anti-Slavery Convention at Philadelphia, December, and The address to the public, issued by the Executive Committee of the society, in September, The United States in was a nation dominated by the institution of slavery and cannot so easily be divided between pro- and anti-slavery factions or provincial distinctions.

The assertion which we made five weeks ago, that "the Constitution, if strictly construed according to its reading," is not a pro-slavery instrument, has excited some interest amongst our Anti-Slavery brethren. Letters have reached us from different quarters on the subject.

Some of these express agreement and pleasure with our views, and others, surprise and dissatisfaction. Salem Female Anti-Slavery Society The Salem Female Anti-Slavery Society (SFASS) was formed in The preamble to the SFASS's constitution stated its three principles: that slavery should be immediately abolished; that people of color, enslaved or free, have a right to a home in the country without fear of intimidation, and that the society.

The society had asked the former slave, who had become one of the most recognized anti-slavery speakers in the nation, to deliver an oration as a part of its Fourth of July observance. Since the Fourth of July fell on a Sunday inthe society moved its observance to Monday, July 5, a decision with which Douglass agreed.

The Philanthropist (–37): newspaper published in Ohio for and owned by the Anti-Slavery Society. The Liberty Bell, by Friends of Freedom (–58): an annual gift book edited and published by Maria Weston Chapman, to be sold or gifted to participants in the National Anti-Slavery Bazaar organized by the Boston Female Anti-Slavery Society.

national anti-slavery standard newspaper of american a s society new york national anti-slavery $ national standard anti-slavery new york newspaper society a american of s s of american national newspaper society york standard a anti-slavery new.

description. Abolitionism (or the Anti-Slavery Movement) in the United States of America was the movement which sought to end slavery in the United States immediately, active both before and during the American Civil the Americas and western Europe, abolitionism was a movement which sought to end the Atlantic slave trade and set slaves free.

In the 18th century, enlightenment thinkers condemned. American Anti-Slavery Society, Executive Committee, Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society, Vice PresidentCounsellor, Hovey was an active supporter of the Women’s Rights Movement.

He helped support the abolitionist movement with significant funding. (Abbot; Richard, ). Some members of the American Anti-Slavery Society, including most members of the Ohio Anti-Slavery Society, thought that Garrison's views were too radical. They agreed that slavery was wrong but also believed that the United States Constitution had created a legitimate government under which the people had the right to end oppression.

[] Constitution of the Anti-Slavery Society of Salem and Vicinity. by Anti-Slavery Society of Salem and Vicinity (Mass.) [] De l'agriculture coloniale: en reponse a M. de Sismondi. by Cools, A. de, baron. available in print [] Remarks on Dr. Channing's Slavery .An illustration of an open book.

Books. An illustration of two cells of a film strip. Video An illustration of an audio speaker. Constitution of the New-England anti-slavery society: with an address to the public Constitution of the New-England anti-slavery society: with an address to the public by Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society.Book/Printed Material Image 3 of The constitution of the American Anti-Slavery Society: with the Declaration of the National Anti-Slavery Convention at Philadelphia, December, and The address to the public, issued by the Executive Committee of the society, in September,